Articles | Volume 4, issue 1
Primate Biol., 4, 127–130, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/pb-4-127-2017
Primate Biol., 4, 127–130, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/pb-4-127-2017
Short communication
26 Jun 2017
Short communication | 26 Jun 2017

Fur-rubbing with Piper leaves in the San Martín titi monkey, Callicebus oenanthe

Rosario Huashuayo-Llamocca and Eckhard W. Heymann

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Cited articles

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Birkinshaw, C. R.: Use of millipedes by black lemurs to anoint their bodies, Folia Primatol., 70, 170–181, 1999.
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Short summary
We report observations fur-rubbing with leaves from the spiked pepper plant, Piper aduncum, in the San Martín titi monkey, Callicebus oenanthe. As leaf extracts from this plant include insecticidal compounds, we interpret this behaviour as a defense against ectoparasites. Our observations expand the number of primate species for which this kind of self-medication is reported.