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Primate Biology An international open-access journal on primate research
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We examined the influence of forest edge effects on activity budgets, feeding ecology, and stress hormone output in five groups of Verreaux’s sifakas (Propithecus verreauxi) in western Madagascar. Sifakas in the edge habitat travelled more, tended to have smaller home ranges, had lower fruit consumption, higher stress hormone levels, and lower birth rates than sifakas in the forest interior. Hence, Verreaux’s sifakas appear to be sensitive to microhabitat characteristics linked to forest edges.
PB | Articles | Volume 8, issue 1
Primate Biol., 8, 1–13, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/pb-8-1-2021
Primate Biol., 8, 1–13, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/pb-8-1-2021

Research article 09 Feb 2021

Research article | 09 Feb 2021

Life on the edge: behavioural and physiological responses of Verreaux's sifakas (Propithecus verreauxi) to forest edges

Klara Dinter et al.

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Short summary
We examined the influence of forest edge effects on activity budgets, feeding ecology, and stress hormone output in five groups of Verreaux’s sifakas (Propithecus verreauxi) in western Madagascar. Sifakas in the edge habitat travelled more, tended to have smaller home ranges, had lower fruit consumption, higher stress hormone levels, and lower birth rates than sifakas in the forest interior. Hence, Verreaux’s sifakas appear to be sensitive to microhabitat characteristics linked to forest edges.
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