Articles | Volume 3, issue 1
Primate Biol., 3, 1–8, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/pb-3-1-2016
Primate Biol., 3, 1–8, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/pb-3-1-2016

Short communication 04 Feb 2016

Short communication | 04 Feb 2016

Meat sharing between male and female Guinea baboons (Papio papio)

A. S. Goffe and J. Fischer

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Cited articles

Altmann, J.: Observational Study of Behavior: sampling methods, Behaviour, 49, 227–267, 1974.
Boese, G.: Behavior and social organization of the Guinea baboon (Papio papio), Doctoral dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland., 1973.
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Cantarero, A., López-Arrabé, J., Palma, A., Redondo, A. J., and Moreno, J.: Males respond to female begging signals of need: a handicapping experiment in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca, Anim. Behav., 94, 167–173, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2014.05.002, 2014.
Carter, G. G. and Wilkinson, G. S.: Food sharing in vampire bats: reciprocal help predicts donations more than relatedness or harassment, P. Roy. Soc. Lond. B, 280, 20122573, https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.2573, 2013.
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Short summary
We describe the acquisition, sharing and consumption of meat by wild Guinea baboons. Males were the hunters and shared meat passively only with females in their social and reproductive units. Females were able to acquire meat from sharing episodes and by scavenging from their male social partners. The presence of existing social bonds, rather than short-term exchanges of meat for sex, is likely a driving factor in the occurrence of meat sharing between males and females in this species.